In an effort to prevent homelessness for low-income veterans and their families, Michigan nonprofit veterans agencies are sharing almost $8.1 million in fiscal 2016 grants. These grants are awarded by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

There are twelve organizations within Michigan that are sharing in grants totaling $8.08 million. Five of these agencies are affiliated with the Detroit VA. One of these grants was $1.57 million to a Detroit-based organization called Southwest Counseling Solutions. Another was $1.4 million to Training and Treatment Innovations Inc, a company based in Oxford. Another was $643,493 to Wayne Metro Community Action Agency which is based in Detroit. Just under that was $590,103 to Blue Water Center for Independent Living, based in Port Huron. Lastly, $274,505 went to Oakland Livingston Human Services Agency, based in Pontiac.

These grants are a part of the 300 million in total grants that are made to agencies serving veterans across the country. The grants are made through the Supportive Service for Veteran Families program, and will fund a number of causes to help veterans. This includes case management, outreach, and other flexible assistance to prevent homelessness or to quickly rehouse veterans who become homeless between October 1st, 2016 until September 30th, 2017.

Between October 2015 and July 2016, program officials recorded 613 permanent housing placements as well as the placement of 772 veterans in permanent supportive housing through VA-funded programs in the Wayne, Macomb, St. Clair, and Oakland countries served by the Detroit VA according to a federal agency’s release.

The agency stated that VA-funded programs served over 157,000 people in the fiscal year 2015. That number is expected is be even higher for the fiscal year 2016. Thanks to these efforts and many others, veteran homelessness is down 47 percent ever since the 2010 launch of the Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness.

Since 2010, over 360,000 veterans and their family members have been rapidly rehoused, permanently housed, or prevented from falling into homelessness by VA’s homelessness program and targeted housing vouchers provided by the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Veteran homelessness is a big problem, but it is slowly decreasing in Michigan thanks to a number of nonprofit veteran agencies. With the addition of the fiscal grants awarded by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, these organizations will continue to work toward ending veteran homelessness.Veteran homelessness is a big problem, but it is slowly decreasing in Michigan thanks to a number of nonprofit veteran agencies. With the addition of the fiscal grants awarded by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, these organizations will continue to work toward ending veteran homelessness.